Public Law

EU and Great Britain flag next to each other.The UK has decided to leave the European Union. So what happens now?

Christine and I have a piece on the Scotsman website discussing the already-famous Article 50 TEU, the prospect of a second Scottish independence referendum and the relationship between the two.

This builds on the work Brodies did in the lead-up to the referendum, considering and advising clients on the raft of legal, political and commercial issues raised by the prospect of Brexit, particularly those specific to Scotland. With Scotland’s leading EU and constitutional law team, we are uniquely placed to help clients in the private, public and third sectors understand and address the many questions arising from this morning’s announcement.

You can find information and guidance on some of the most important issues at our Referendum ‘hub’ and on this blog, including:

  • the process and timetable for leaving the EU –  read more;
  • the effect of Brexit on UK and Scots law and regulation – read more;
  • the potential models for a new UK-EU trading relationships – read more;
  • the possible relationship between a Leave vote and the prospect of another Scottish independence referendum – read more;

We are ready and willing to help you navigate the key issues, assess what Brexit will mean for you and formulate an appropriate strategy. Please get in touch with me, Christine or your usual Brodies contact if we can be of any assistance.

In the meantime, we will be posting regular updates here as the issues develop over the coming weeks and months. To make sure you don’t miss any, please do click the subscribe button to the right to receive an email alert when anything new goes up.

Charles Livingstone

Charles Livingstone

Partner at Brodies LLP
Charles works with a broad range of commercial, public sector, charitable and individual clients, advising them on public law issues including judicial review, human rights, information law and the powers and duties of local and other public authorities. He is named by Chambers & Partners in both Competition Law and Administrative & Public Law.
Charles Livingstone